Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design

Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design

Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design
Highly decorative Japanese porcelain 8 ½ plate with early transferware design in cobalt blue and edged in brown, c 1900. Early transferware design Japanese porcelain plate with a ridged (piecrust-style) iron brown rim.

A heavy hand thrown plate showing the potters rings. The transferware designs are of pagodas, mountains, water, and boats, alternating with geometric and floral designs. The central medallion is of a Kirin.

The back has an organic scrolling designs. The foot ring is unglazed but the base is glazed. The transferware designs are not perfect, showing blank spots, fading and smudges. "Igezara" is a term applied to heavy, durable everyday porcelain produced in Japan from about the end of the Edo Period (mid 1800's) until early Taisho (early 1900's) in Arita, Saga in Kyushu, or in Gifu. Igezara was made for the common man and usually thickly potted so withstand wear and tear and daily use.

The generally accepted period Igezara was made is 1880 - 1910 but may have had some early and late examples. The book Igezara by Alistair Seaton is the main reference book on this ware. Fine porcelain such as the colorful Imari and Kutani were hand painted whereas "igezara" items were produced by a technique that transferred a design after which the plate was glazed. The name "igezara" comes from two Japanese words...

"Ige" means "notch or thorn" and the term refers to the pie-like indentations around the rim of many of the plates. "Zara" or "sara" means "plate" in Japanese. "Igezara" were thus mass produced for everyday use though only limited numbers have survived today. Whereas many items of Imari and Kutani were produced for the export market, "igezara" were made primarily for the Japanese market. There is a glazed over potting flaw chip on rim. There is one small chip on the rim that shows only from back. There is wear to the plate face from usage. An incredible blue and white plate that shows the exotic Kirin mythical beast. We just ask that you notify us before returning and obtain our authorization. This will ensure quick processing.

The item "Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design" is in sale since Tuesday, August 29, 2017. This item is in the category "Antiques\Asian Antiques\Japan\Plates". The seller is "bearandraven" and is located in Ferndale, Washington.

This item can be shipped worldwide.


Meiji Period Japanese Blue & White Porcelain Igezara plate with Kirin Design